DEA Agent Laundering Money for the Colombian Drug Cartel 

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DEA Agent Jose Irizarry

Cristal M Clark 

Sometimes working for a Federal Agency just isn’t quite enough to cover all of one’s especially if that individual has a taste for the finer things in life. Case in point, DEA agent 46-year-old Jose Irizarry decided that he needed some side work for some extra cash, that side work being money laundering, for the Colombian Drug Cartel, the very cartel he was supposed to be investigating. 

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According to his arrest affidavit he utilized his position and his special access to information to divert millions in drug proceeds from control of the Drug Enforcement Administration and into the pockets of he and his new friends. 

Jose had been a model agent, he had awards, had received praise from his supervisors. Overall he was a model agent according to his history with the DEA. 

After joining the DEA in Miami 2009, he was entrusted with an undercover money laundering operation using front companies, shell bank accounts and couriers.  

Things started to fall apart for Jose who resigned in January 2018 after he had been reassigned to Washington and that made his boss in Colombia suspicious.

In 2011, Jose allegedly used the cover of his badge to file false reports and mislead his superiors, all while directing DEA personnel to wire funds reserved for undercover stings to accounts in Spain, the Netherlands and elsewhere that he controlled or were tied to his wife and his co-conspirators.

He’s also accused of sharing sensitive law enforcement information with his co-conspirators which is a given of course he did. 

Jose did not come without red flags, despite how well he looked on paper whilst working for the DEA. When he was hired by the DEA he showed signs of deception in a polygraph exam, and had declared bankruptcy with debts of almost $500,000. Still, he was permitted to handle financial transactions after being hired by the DEA.

It was also well known that Jose and his wife adored living the life of luxury, Jose even enjoyed high priced prostitutes, they threw lavish parties. Agent’s enjoyed hanging out with Jose. This guy basically laundered US dollars right under the nose of his bosses and then proceeded to flaunt it in their very faces. 

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Jose handled roughly $3.8 million that should have  been carefully tracked by the DEA as part of undercover money laundering investigations. 

Not all of that amount was pocketed by the co-conspirators, but the indictment details at least $900,000 that was paid out from a single criminal account opened by Jose and an informant using the name, passport and social security number of a third person who was unaware that their identity was being stolen.

Proceeds from the alleged scheme funded a veritable spending spree. It included the purchase of a $30,000 Tiffany diamond ring, a BMW, 3 Land Rovers and a $767,000 home in Cartagena as well as homes in south Florida and Puerto Rico, where the couple has been living. The money also funded the purchase in Miami of a 2017 Lamborghini Huracan Spyder on behalf of a family member of co-conspirator 2.

To hide his tracks, Jose allegedly opened a bank account in someone else’s name and used the victim’s forged signature and Social Security number. Jose and his wife were arrested Friday at their home near San Juan, Puerto Rico, as part of a 19-count federal indictment. 

And if you think all of that is bad, the worst is that other agents and special ops are also now compromised, you see in all likelihood Jose did more than just launder money, sharing of information would have been part of the deal. 

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This indictment comes on the heels of another DEA agent being sentenced to Federal Prison for his involvement in drug smuggling, hence further tarnishing the illustrious image of the DEA and brings yet another loss to the US in the war on drugs effort. Then again didn’t big pharma make it that much worse, just legally?

Cristal M Clark

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5 Minors Killed After Police Kidnapped Them

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Mexico City – Drug Cartels

Cristal M Clark 

Naturally only in Mexico could this “accident” happen. The Mexican Government has come forward and apologized for for deaths of at least 5 minors who had been taken by police then promptly handed over to the one of the most violent known drug gangs in Mexico.

It should be noted that this is in fact rare for Mexico to actually admit to the state’s culpability/participation in such crimes.

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Officials initially lied, in their initial statement they insisted that the youth were criminals when they went missing in 2016 in the Gulf state of Veracruz, one of Mexico’s most violent places to visit or disappear in.

Columba Arroniz, a mother of one of the dead youth had this to say whilst tears streamed down her face; “More than anything, we want to reclaim the good name of our kids … and demand justice for them and for thousands of others who experience the same thing.”

The minors, 3 boys and 1 girl were on their way home when they were stopped by local police, in what police are calling “the mistaken belief they had ties to a gang,” then turned over to members of the powerful Jalisco New Generation Cartel.

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They were then murdered and their bodies incinerated, according to preliminary findings. Which has all of the same markings as the 2014 abduction subsequent massacre of 43 trainee teachers in southwest Mexico, in which the government did admit that police were involved.

One debate has been brewing for some time and that is, should the United States suck it up and consider the cartels and drug gangs from Mexico terrorist groups? This debate, well it has really started heating up again, along with more and more support for it.

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Cartels fight in an effort to control trafficking routes, the illegal drug trade, human smuggling, extortion and kidnapping.

In the last decade turf wars among increasingly splintered criminal cartels have left more than 40,000 people missing, as well as around 26,000 unidentified corpses in over 1,100 mass graves scattered about Mexico.

Perhaps it is time to change the game and rather than simply having a heated debate about considering the cartels terrorists and actually have real honest discussions because they are our closest neighbors and are currently moving slowly but surely north of that southern border.

Cristal M Clark

IOS users can find The Crime Shop on Apple News

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions – And his “War on Thugs”

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Jeff Sessions Can’t Back up His Mandatory Sentencing Claims

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The Trump administration’s tough on crime agenda is about as useful as decaf coffee.

It has no use other than in the garbage.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions latest reason to be tough on crime was to creatively without any proof, reference a memo by the Obama Administration that had suggested that federal prosecutors avoid charges for low-level drug offenders that could trigger lengthy mandatory minimums.

Sessions clearly not understanding how crime rates work, quite disagrees with that memo. His rather dull, unproven and completely inaccurate argument is that the memo actually caused violent crime to spike for the first time in decades and he incorrectly suggested that his decision to revoke the memo will, in turn, cause violent crime to fall, with absolutely zero proof what so ever that the memo did in fact cause crime to spike.

Which it didn’t by the way.

Throughout the history of crime it has never once been proven that mandatory sentencing has ever brought crime numbers down.

Ever.

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What we do tend to see when we study crime rates are things like poverty, drugs, gangs and alcohol tend to help increase crime levels along with as you might have guessed, a growing population.

To break that down into layman’s terms for someone like Jeff Sessions who so very clearly has no grasp on crime in our nation, our population overall is growing and any time you have a growing population you will see an increase in crime rates because, well, as one might also guess crime rates grow as the population grows.

So the demand is bigger, poverty is a bigger problem, drug use becomes a bigger problem, gangs become a bigger problem and so on and so forth.

To take that a step even further, it’s not always really an increase in crime if you are looking at just numbers, although it may appear that way because of the of the way crime stats are reported, one has to compare those numbers with the numbers of the population which very few of us actually do, especially the mainstream media.

The point is simple, crime rates usually tend to keep up with the growth of the population that supports it. So the numbers in relation to its population really have not increased overall, despite what they were the year before, or year before that, etc. It’s not like the population is shrinking here.

More often than not, mandatory sentencing can do more harm than good because mandatory sentencing tends to create blanket sentencing. The one crime, one sentence for all type of thing.

The sad fact is that we currently live in a society where blanket sentencing is no longer an appropriate nor effective way of dealing with crime at any level.

I once had two shoplifting cases before me, from the same store. But the crime because the individuals were two completely different people, was in fact different.

Here’s why:

In one case, the defendant shoplifted frivolously meaning that individual stole, makeup, hair product, nail polish, etc. This particular individual had a rather good education and upbringing. This individual also did not care about being charged with shoplifting and was not aiming to change any time soon.

Defendant #2, this individual shoplifted food, generic food, things like cheap hamburger, rice, beans, baby formula, a couple of bags of oranges and baby diapers. She had an 8th grade education, had married an immigrant who had been deported and was left overnight with no income, no job and no way to support her family.

While both were in the wrong, they should not have been sentenced the same way. Our society is starting to see the clear difference in crimes that are committed and by whom. While we do not condone the crimes we need to understand why they were committed so that others will not resort to the same thing.

We set up a judicial system to reform and to teach others a lesson about not following in the footsteps of those before, yet we do very little to ensure that other than to jail and hand down mandatory sentencing.

We can’t keep enforcing mandatory sentencing as a way to control crime, you control crime by becoming educated yourself as to why it is happening in the first place.

This is where you learn how to head it off before it happens again.

But I am not the Attorney General, who should already know this and be somewhat more forward thinking. It is 2017 after all.

Besides, throughout the entire history of crime and putting laws on the books in an effort to prevent crime has that done anything other than instill the very idea of committing said crime into someone’s head in new and creative ways? Think about it.

Cristal M Clark

IOS users can find The Crime Shop on Apple News

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